MLCB conference – retrospection

After a busy week – it started on Saturday 19th with the two-days EduCamp (#echb11)  and ended with the Medien Kongress in Berlin (#kbom11) on March 25 – it is time to close the chapter MLCB 2011 (#MLCB). This post is simply to reflect on lessons learnt and issues emerging, and to provide URLs to resources that we collected and compiled in order to allow for something like sustainability.

But to start with, our sincerest thanks goes to all those who contributed to the conference – participants, reviewers, media people, assistants, organisers … We think that the conference was a success – which is a result of the engagement of the participants who made the conference to what it turned out to be. We have seen ourselves as providers of spaces and places only and hoped that people would accept our offer ;-) However, from our point of view the atmosphere was very constructive, friendly and relaxed, and it was great to see so many dear friends and colleagues attending one of the first mobile learning conferences in Germany.

So, as for the reflection part, the following might assist for the moment:

 

Stats
After two conference days not only the stats tell the organisers that they dealt with lots of input and output: We had about 100 participants from 19 countries (Austria, Botswana, Canada, Catalonia, Denmark, Germany, Finland, France, Indonesia, Italy, Japan, Kazakhstan, Latvia, Nigeria, Sweden, Sitzerland, Turkey, England/UK, USA). They contributed with 50 papers, workshops and video presentations to about 40 hours programme.
Our team of 7 organising committee members of which 4 did the executive organisation was supported by 7 assistants, 1 videographer, 1 radio producer, 1 photographer and 1 designer. 30 reviewers supported us in selecting proposals, and 5 members of the organising committee edited the book of abstracts.
Finally, we have several hundrets of GB of data – video, audio, photo – which gives impressions only of what people quantitatively gained from the conference.

Resources for subsequent use
During the 2 conference days we collected so much data that we are not able any longer to host them on our own servers. The videos and photos that were made during the conference are/will be available on Vimeo, Youtube, Flickr and the Pontydysgu website accordingly. Some are abvailable yet, others will be available soon.

  • Podacsts from the Sounds of the Bazaar live radio shows can be streamed from the Pontydysgu website. Day 1 and Day 2.
  • MirandaMod Mindmeister Map.
  • Book of abstracts from the LMLG website is available here for download.
  • Photos are collected on the LMLG flickr page.
  • Videos from the presentations and Interveiws are available via the LMLG website.
  • Presentations are collected on the MLCB Cloudworks cloudscape. If you haven’t done so yet, please share your presentation via Cloudworks, too.

Bring people together in advance
The ‘Mobile Learning: Crossing Boundaries in Convergent Environments’ (#MLCB) Conference was opened by the get-together on the event ship Treue on Sunday evening. Meeting people before the conference begins turned out to be a quite smooth start into scientific exchange. And it provided additional time to get familiar with interesting people, projects and ideas which is often missing during the conferences – at last for the organisers.

Provide spaces and places
In order to allow for discussions and self-organised activites during the conference, it is helpful to have rooms available – such as lobby, café, terrace – which people can use to meet, talk and exchange their ideas. Such spaces are framed by the “formality” of the conference and conference activies, but helps networking in an informal ambience.

Keep the setting open for people from different fields and disciplines
Even if organisers and participants agreed on mobile learning as topic of the MLCB conference people bring different discussions and discourses to a conference. Especially appreciated is interdisciplinarity – we learnt this from feedback that we received during and after the conference. Interdisciplinarity was perceived as being a fruitful basis to widen the own perspective and to gain insights into disciplines that are dealing with the same topic but that refer to different theories, models, aims and goals.

Be open for different contents to track trending topics
Also at this conference practice seemed to be basis for considerations about implementation of mobile technologies and usability in different settings. Theoretical approaches were presented, too, but related to the ratio theory : practice, theory was underrepresented. However, the MLCB conference was thematically dominated by Higher Education and Health Care / Medical Education – two issues that seem to be trending topics in the near future. Learning in schools by using mobile devices seems to be the basis of the mobile learning research that is taken for granted; now it could be time to discover new areas and places to explore mobile learning opportunities and constraints.

Low-budget event moves attendees from being audience only to being engaged participants in discussions
As highlighted by Graham Attwell several times already the MLCB conference run low-budget. We decided to keep fees low in order to allow also people with no or low refund opportunities to attend (undergraduate students and unemployed were free). To run such cost-saving event was possible only because the Bremen Youth Hostel provided first class service for small budgets: with the conference fees we did not only rent 5 rooms in the premises of the YH but it also included 2 coffee breaks and lunch at each of the two days. One side effect was that people seemed to expect to entertain themselves instead being entertained. Not sure if there is any relation, but the atmosphere was very constructive and full of discussion.

Lessons learnt and issues emerging
On our latest post-conference meeting we made a small and very informal review of the conference and discussed about what we consider as being necessary to be improved and what was resolved successfully. A more detailed version of our lessons learnt will be available soon on the Pontydysgu weblog and here, on Media Education Culture. To start with, here are some issues that came to my mind during the last couple of days.

  • poster sessions are under-valued but great opportunity to demonstrate work-in-progress
  • keep conference small and allow for a good number of breaks and rooms in order to provide space for exchange and networking
  • refer to web 2.0 tools that people are using also outside conferences instead of introducing new tools
  • for small organising teams: avoid to organise hotels but provide lists instead

Sounds of the Bazaar live internet radio at the MLCB conference

Graham Attwell, Jenny Hughes and Dirk Stieglitz did a great job with the live radio show from our MLCB conference which took place in Bremen on March 21 and 22, 2011.
The podcast is available from the Pontydysgu weblog. Below is the description of the two shows as well as the URL to the podcasts. Each show runs about 30 minutes and is really worth to be listened to.

 

Day 1
URL day 1: http://www.pontydysgu.org/2011/03/sounds-of-the-bazaar-at-the-mlcb-in-bremen/

The live internet radio programmes from The Mobile Learning Conference Bremen this week were a real gas. We are pretty confident with our sound set up these days which leaves us free to focus on content. And I think we did a pretty good job in catching the debates and ideas of the conference. If you are interested in the theory and practice of mobile learning, then I’d recommend you to listen to the two programmes. Each lasts about half an hour.

The first programme features Daniela Reimann talking about her keynote presentation on art and mobile devices. Andy Black preveiws his popular workshop on future trends in the use of mobiles for learning. Klaus Rummler, one of the conference commitee, tells us why and how the conference was organised. Julia Laxton, from Leeds University Medical School, talks about the use of mobiles in medical education and issues for institutions. Anke Königschulte from Bremen talks about using audio technologies in museums. And last but not least, John Traxler looks at the international dimension of the use of mobile devices for learning.

 

Day 2
URL to the podcast: http://www.pontydysgu.org/2011/03/second-radio-programme-from-the-mlcb-2011/

Here is the recording of the Sounds of the Bazaar live internet radio programme broadcast from the MLCB-Conference 2011 in Bremen.just as in the first day, we focused on encouraging participants to tell their own stories about the use of mobile devices for learning in different contexts.

First up on this programme was Helen Keegan who has earlier wowed the conference with her presentation on mobiles and film (more to come on this). Jenny Hughes went on to interview Ceridwen Coulby, Alice Huskinson, Prabhjoyt Kler, Catherine MacMillan and  Helen Macrorie, students at Leeds Univeristy Medical School, about their perspective on use of mobile devices in medicine and health care. Antje Breitkopf talks about the One Laptop Per Child project, based on her experience of working with the project in Peru. And in a series of vox-pops Jenny Hughes talks to John Potter and Ludger Deitmer amongst others about their impressions of the main issues arsing from the conference.

http://www.pontydysgu.org/2011/03/second-radio-programme-from-the-mlcb-2011/

Presentation “Critical perspective on mobile learning” held at MLCB

On March 21, 2011 I held my presentation “A critical perspective on mobile learning: Results of a heuristic analysis of the scientific process and a hermeneutic analysis of mobile learning practice” at the “Mobile learning: Crossing boundaries in convergent environments” conference in Bremen (conference website).

 

Video

A Critical Perspective on Mobile Learning: Results…

 

Abstract

The following abstract was published in
Rummler, Klaus; Seipold, Judith; Lübcke, Eileen; Pachler, Norbert; Attwell, Graham (eds.): Mobile learning:
Crossing boundaries in convergent environments. Book of abstracts. 21-22 March 2011, Bremen, Germany. ISSN 1753-3385
which is available for download at http://www.londonmobilelearning.net/downloads/MLCB_BOA_Bremen-2011_Crossing-Boundaries-full_2011-03-18.pdf.

 

Judith Seipold

A critical perspective on mobile learning: Results of a heuristic analysis of the scientific process and a hermeneutic analysis of mobile learning practice

Abstract
Educational and pedagogic research on mobile learning is about ten years old. Over this time the scientific process can be split into three phases, which reach from (1) research on practice via (2) the application of existing learning theories to (3) the generation of new theoretical and conceptual frameworks for mobile learning. With a view to the different lines of development within these phases it becomes evident that there are e.g. attempts not only to understand what mobile learning is, but also to demand changes in the educational system. The latter refers not least to a process of democratisation of learners and learning that is about to take place.
Focussing on mobile learning practice, ambiguities and contradictions in the use of mobile devices in learning contexts appear. They stand in contrast to what research on mobile learning suggests, e.g. ad-hoc use of mobile devices, collaborative learning, the crossing of conceptual and local contexts etc. On the other hand, practice also suggests the power of learners being able to create new learning spaces and concepts as well as implementing multimedia and multiple modes into school learning that replace the written text as dominant mode for learning.
The paper will outline the scientific processes of the mobile learning field with a focus on the educational and pedagogic developments in mobile learning taking place in the UK and in Germany. The results deriving from this heuristic and hermeneutic analysis will be reflected critically in order to reveal ‘pseudo’ changes and ‘success stories’ in the use of mobile devices for learning, as well as the potential of such a discussion.

Keywords
mobile learning, theory, practice, scientific process, analysis, qualitative heuristics, objective hermeneutic, dialectics of practice

1. Structure of the scientific process of the educational and pedagogic research on mobile learning
The development of the scientific mobile learning discussion in the UK over the recent years resulted in the autonomy of the discipline in the educational and pedagogic field.
Referring to categories of a qualitative heuristic method, the process can be described in terms of social and cultural contexts of the mobile learning discussion (i.e. related disciplines such as sociology and e-learning), the social practices constituting the mobile learning discussion (i.e. lines of argumentation, concepts, definitions), and the developing process characterising the mobile learning discussion. The latter consists of three phases each of which is characterised by lines of development. Whilst the phases are structured by time, the lines of development can be seen as characterising the respective chronological phases. In addition, the lines of development are describable as approaches and fields of research that are persisting independent of time.
Phase 1: Explorative, technology-centred and practical implementation: Phase one can be described as explorative. Mobile devices were installed in educational settings in order to see how mobile technologies allow for changes in teaching and learning processes. The discussion was very much technology driven.
Phase 2: Application of existing theories and conceptual frameworks: The second phase focuses on the application of existing theories and conceptual frameworks such as Activity Theory (Engeström, 2001, 2005) and the Conversational Framework (Laurillard, 2007), as well as on personal (Green, Facer, Rudd, Dillon, & Humphreys, 2005), collaborative and situated learning (Lave & Wenger, 1991) with the aim to explore dynamic processes around formal and informal learning and knowledge building.
Phase 3: Building of theories and conceptual frameworks: The third and most recent phase is structured by attempts to build theories and conceptual frameworks, e.g. the socio-cultural ecology of mobile learning (Pachler, Bachmair, & Cook, 2010) or the “Theory of mobile learning” (Sharples, Taylor & Vavoula, 2010). Now, the learner is seen as standing at the centre of his/her learning processes. Against the background of the construction of theoretical and conceptual frameworks, the role of the devices is becoming less important. Instead, the social/societal framework and the learners’ expertise, agency and cultural practices are gaining importance. Mobility is no longer defined through the devices, but through the learners’ abilities to act flexible in ever changing and self-constructed learning contexts.

2. The dialectics of mobile learning practice
The analysis of mobile learning practices in school contexts was realised according to categories that were developed against the background of the socio-cultural ecology of mobile learning (Pachler, Bachmair & Cook, 2010). Focusing on the actual use of mobile technologies and convergent media it became evident that learning with mobile devices does not necessarily foster ad-hoc, collaborative, personalised, self-directed and innovative learning. In most cases, the teaching design is pre-structuring the use of the devices and thus limits in consequence the potentials inherent in the use of mobile technologies for learning. Here, mobile learning appears as old wine in new bottles. In case teachers are providing spaces to learners to act according to their expertises, interests, agency and cultural practices, innovative use of the devices and the generation of contexts by learners can be discovered. Here, user-generated contexts are a fruitful concept to frame mobile learning and to approach the design, the use and the analysis of mobile learning.

3. Methodology: qualitative heuristics and objective hermeneutic

The scientific process of the mobile learning discussion was carried out by using a qualitative heuristic method (see e.g. Kleining & Witt, 2000; Krotz, 2005). This ‘discovering’ method means that the analysis intends to bring aspects to the foreground that are inherent in the discussion. By referring to key components of this method, the following aspects were considered in order to allow for the caption of this phenomenon: the development process, social practices relevant for establishing the discussion, the contexts in which the field was raising and the meanings deriving from the development process.
As for the analysis of mobile learning practices, a hermeneutic analysis was undertaken. Hermeneutics is an interpretative method, which means that the scientist interprets phenomena according to his or her research questions, the theoretical background he or she is using and his or her ‘preferred reading patterns’.
Together, the heuristic and the hermeneutic analysis of the mobile learning field allow for conclusions that are able to describe and understand the field according to its structure, elements, development lines and their relation to each other as well as for tendencies and contradictions. The aim is to not only to be able to characterise the field, but also to point to discrepancies and thus aspects that need to be considered for further research and the development of the mobile learning field.

4. Results: Mobile Learning is governed by political demands, contradictions in practices and innovative potentials
From this perspective mobile learning is not only about learning but also – and more generally – about politics and the need to understand the school system, learning and the roles of teachers and learners in the context of current changes of mass communication and society. However, having a look at the mobile learning practice, there are several issues that are standing in contradiction with what research and theory development suggest. In fact, a lot of ‘pseudo’-opening is taking place which makes mobile learning often appear as old wine in new bottles. This applies for example to features of mobile devices such as the ad-hoc access to and distribution of information, to the teaching design that can reduce learners’ activities with mobile devices to behaviouristic learning instead of supporting constructivist learning, or to situated learning that can become gathering of information through the use of convergent media such as platforms. Besides, and this is part of the dialectics of mobile learning, there are real enhancements and innovations taking place in the use of mobile devices which are on the one hand achievements of the learners themselves, and which might on the other hand result from what is described as “pseudo-opening” above. Former are related to the use of modes of representation as well as the learners’ creativity. Also, learners revise existing structures, connect them and established new ones in order to create their own convergent learning spaces and “learner-generated contexts” (see e.g. Cook, 2010). Latter provide structures for equal access of information and discursive engagement in learning materials.

References
Cook, J. (2010). Mobile Learner Generated Contexts. Research on the Internalization of the World of Cultural Products. In B. Bachmair (Ed.), Medienbildung in neuen Kulturräumen. Die deutschsprachige und britische Diskussion (pp. 113–125). Wiesbaden: VS Verlag für Sozialwissenschaften.

Engeström, Y. (2001). Expansive learning at work: Toward an activity theoretical reconceptualisation. Journal of Education and Work, 14(1), 133–156.

Engeström, Y. (2005). Knotworking to Create Collaborative Intentionality Capital in Fluid Organizational Fields. Advances in Interdisciplinary Studies of Work Teams, (11), 307–336. Retrieved from http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/S1572-0977(05)11011-5.

Green, H., Facer, K., Rudd, T., Dillon, P., & Humphreys, P. (2005). Personalisation and Digital Technologies (Futurelab Report).

Kleining, G., & Witt, H. (2000). Qualitativ-heuristische Forschung als Entdeckungsmethodologie für Psychologie und Sozialwissenschaften: Die Wiederentdeckung der Methode der Introspektion als Beispiel. Forum Qualitative Sozialforschung, 1(1). Retrieved from http://nbn-resolving.de/urn:nbn:de:0114-fqs0001136.

Krotz, F. (2005). Neue Theorien entwickeln: Eine Einführung in die Grounded Theory, die Heuristische Sozialforschung und die Ethnographie anhand von Beispielen aus der Kommunikationsforschung. Köln: Herbert von Halem Verlag. Retrieved from http://www.gbv.de/dms/hebis-darmstadt/toc/11253757X.pdf.

Laurillard, D. (2007). Pedagogical forms for mobile learning: framing research question. In N. Pachler (Ed.), Occasional Papers in Work-based Learning: Vol. 1. Mobile learning – towards a research agenda (pp. 153–175). London: WLE Centre. Retrieved from http://www.wlecentre.ac.uk/cms/files/occasionalpapers/mobilelearning_pachler_2007.pdf.

Lave, J., & Wenger, E. (1991). Situated learning: Legitimate peripheral participation. Learning in Doing: Social, Cognitive, and Computational Perspect. Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press.

Pachler, N., Bachmair, B., & Cook, J. (2010). Mobile learning: structures, agency, practices. New York: Springer.

Sharples, M., Taylor, J., & Vavoula, G. (2010). A Theory of Learning for the Mobile Age. Learning through Conversation and Exploration Across Contexts. In B. Bachmair (Ed.), Medienbildung in neuen Kulturräumen. Die deutschsprachige und britische Diskussion (pp. 87–99). Wiesbaden: VS Verlag für Sozialwissenschaften.

Poster presentation about MoLeaP held at MLCB conference

On March 21, 2011 I gave a poster presentation entitled “MoLeaP – the mobile learning project database” at the “Mobile learning: Crossing boundaries in convergent environments” conference in Bremen (conference website).

 

Poster

MoLeaP-Poster_DINA0_2011-03-11[1]

 

Video

Poster Presentation by Judith Seipold

 

Abstract

The following abstract was published in
Rummler, Klaus; Seipold, Judith; Lübcke, Eileen; Pachler, Norbert; Attwell, Graham (eds.): Mobile learning:
Crossing boundaries in convergent environments. Book of abstracts. 21-22 March 2011, Bremen, Germany. ISSN 1753-3385
which is available for download at http://www.londonmobilelearning.net/downloads/MLCB_BOA_Bremen-2011_Crossing-Boundaries-full_2011-03-18.pdf.

 

Judith Seipold

MoLeaP – the mobile learning project database

Abstract
This poster aims to introduce ‘MoLeaP – the mobile learning project database’, a service provided by the London Mobile Learning Group (LMLG; www.londonmobilelearning.net) via www.moleap.net. MoLeaP is a public and free-of-charge online database for education professionals interested in mobile learning practice underpinned by theory. Projects, applications, and resources can be submitted by users in order to make materials and experiences available to a broad audience and to encourage the implementation of mobile learning projects in different learning contexts, such as school/college/university, family, workplace, and/or everyday life to enhance the replicability of mobile learning projects, and to contribute to sustainability in teaching, learning and research on mobile learning. The database categories are based on a conceptual framework of a socio-cultural ecology of mobile learning and are derived from a methodological framework for the description and analysis of mobile learning practice.

Keywords
mobile learning project database, replicability, transferability, socio-cultural ecology, methodology

1. Introduction
Research on mobile learning is essentially related to the implementation of mobile learning projects in different contexts such as education or everyday life. Projects are characterized by different approaches to teaching and learning, locations and a broad variety of technologies; also, they are dealing with mobile technologies as topic or they support their use as learning and teaching tools. As the rapidly emerging field of mobile learning originates a tremendous amount of mobile learning projects, ‘MoLeaP – the mobile learning projects database’ is conceptualized as a resource and tool for people who are interested in mobile learning, especially in sharing their experiences and projects with others, or in learning from already existing projects. The database – which is based on the idea of collaborative knowledge building – aims to provide opportunities for the systematic gathering of practice,

  • to distribute knowledge which was gained within such projects in order to make practice less ephemeral,
  • to enable synergies,
  • to contribute to sustainability in teaching, learning and research, as well as
  • to enhance replicability of mobile learning projects.

Also, MoLeaP aims to provide a rich resource for mobile learning experiences in order to allow researchers and practitioners from all over the world easy access to projects and relevant resources. The categories for project description might assist practitioners in planning mobile learning projects and enhance dissemination, replicability, and transferability of projects by providing a common basis. It is hoped that the database will be able to support educators in the implementation of mobile media and mobile learning projects in any educational context and that it contributes to sustainability in teaching, learning, and research.

2. Theoretical and Methodological Background
The project database combines theory, research and application and aims to provide straightforward functionality on the basis of design principles derived from principled conceptual work (Seipold, Pachler, & Cook, 2009; Seipold & Pachler, 2010; Pachler, Bachmair, & Cook, 2010) in an attempt to facilitate the sharing of pedagogical practice. The categories, which are used to describe and analyze mobile learning projects, are based on the theoretical background of a socio-cultural ecology of learning with mobile devices (Pachler et al., 2010; Pachler, 2010). The socio-cultural ecology consist of the three key components: structures, agency and cultural practices and aims to describe mobile learning as a process within changing mass communication and thus changing appropriation mechanisms attendant to engagement in masse communication. As a consequence, the database is open to any projects with mobile media, irrespective of the notion of learning underpinning it and irrespective of the setting.

2.1 Categories for Project Descriptions
The theoretical work of the LMLG has led to a set of categories, which are intended to be applicable to projects taking place inside and outside of educational institutions; they provide the basis for the categories of MoLeaP. The structure of the database has been designed to be helpful to colleagues planning mobile learning projects by flagging key considerations to be attended to during the planning and evaluation phases, in addition to fostering shareability by providing a common ‘language’ (soft ontology) to talk about practice:

1. General project data:
language of the project description; project name; URL; country; year; project owner and copyright holder; contact; partners; project workers; language in which the project was conducted; types of mobile devices; further media; age of participants; number of learners involved; number of teachers involved; number of supporting staff; role of supporting staff; duration; location; location latitude & longitude (of the location where the project was conducted; for further implication in location-aware contexts); type of educational establishment; phase of education; subject domain; teaching/ learning focus; tags/ keywords; optional text field.

2. Context/rationale:
background information, i.e. how many persons; type of educational establishment; duration; devices used; technical support etc.; learning and teaching aims; and envisioned role of mobile devices.

3. Approaches to teaching and learning:
how are the devices used; key activities, key tasks, and key pedagogical/‘didactic’ issues.

4. Technologies and requirements:
interoperability, storage, usability etc.

5. Project outcomes.

6. Lessons learned/ issues emerging.

7. Recommendations and future possibilities.

8. Replicability and transferability.

9. Recommended literature and references (optional).

10. Project analysis (optional).

2.2 Categories for Project Analyses
The analysis framework might best be described as heuristic and hermeneutic with relevance for mobile learning in the context of a socio-cultural ecology, covered under meta-categories rather than a rigid analysis scheme. The analysis framework is open to examples from school contexts as well as to examples from everyday life. We opened the analysis to aspects of identity construction, and social inclusion/exclusion in order to be able to access the most evident issues of cases of mobile use from everyday life. Also here, the criteria for the analysis relate to key concepts of the theoretical framework of the LMLG of a socio-cultural ecology. As this framework deals with a number of theoretical concepts, which are not self-explanatory, contributors to MoLeaP are free to provide a project analysis that refers to the following categories:

1. Agency, structure, cultural practice:
e.g. new habitus and social segmentation; ‘at-risk learners’; literacy, traditional vs. new; understanding media as cultural resources; participation in cultural practices.

2. Approaches to teaching and learning:
e.g. informal/situated/collaborative/problem-based learning; bricolage; knowledge building; meaning-making.

3. Notions of mobility:
e.g. mobile device used as tool; mobile devices used in relation to meanings; mobility in contexts (place, time, concepts, social constellations, activities, curriculum, cultural resources, and meanings).

4. User-generated contents and contexts:
e.g. transformation of mass communication; mobility; learning as meaning-making in context; ubiquity, choice, appropriation; context crossing.

5. Replicability and transferability:
e.g. replicability and transferability of the ‘didaktik’ script, using it in a new context; scalability.

2.3 Categories for applications and resources
In order to address not only practitioners through project concepts but also people who are only interested in the use of single applications, or in references to literature and project websites, MoLeaP covers these aspects as well. The option to systematically submit references, e.g. to project websites, to the database makes project websites quotable and allows researchers to refer to such projects in texts by means of references. The categories for the submission of applications and resources differ from the project categories in order to meet the requirements for providing information about applications and resources.

3. Poster
The poster will show a short abstract, followed by an overview on aims, theory, project categories and analysis categories. Also, it will provide a short introduction to the features of the website.

References
Pachler, N. (2010). The Socio-Cultural Ecological Approach to Mobile Learning: An Overview. In B. Bachmair (Ed.), Medienbildung in neuen Kulturräumen. Die deutschsprachige und britische Diskussion (pp. 153–167). Wiesbaden: VS Verlag für Sozialwissenschaften.

Pachler, N., Bachmair, B., & Cook, J. (2010). Mobile learning: structures, agency, practices. New York: Springer. Seipold, J., & Pachler, N. (2010). MoLeaP – The Mobile Learning Project Database: A Pool for Projects and Tool for Systematic Description and Analysis of Mobile Learning Practice. Journal of the Research Center for Educational Technology, 6(1), 157–171. Retrieved from http://www.rcetj.org/index.php/rcetj/article/view/87/192.

Seipold, J., Pachler, N., & Cook, J. (2009). Towards a methodology of researching mobile learning. In N. Pachler & J. Seipold (Eds.), Mobile learning cultures across education, work and leisure. Book of abstracts. Proceedings of the 3rd WLE Mobile Learning Symposium, 27 March 2009 (pp. 121–128). London. Retrieved from http://www.londonmobilelearning.net/symposium/downloads/3rd_wle_mlearning_symposium_-_book_of_abstracts_single_page_display.pdf.

Seipold, J. & The London Mobile Learning Group (LMLG) (2008-2011). MoLeaP – The mobile learning project database/ MoLeaP – Die m-learning Projektdatenbank. Retrieved from http://www.moleap.net.

The London Mobile Learning Group (LMLG) (2007-2011). The London Mobile Learning Group (LMLG). Retrieved from http://www.londonmobilelearning.net.

MLCB conference book of abstracts

Today in the afternoon we published the book of abstracts of the ‘Mobile learning: Crossing boundaries in convergent environments’ Conference. The file is available as download from the LMLG website.

The BOA is edited by Klaus Rummler, Judith Seipold, Eileen Lübcke, Norbert Pachler and Graham Attwell and runs under the ISSN No. 1753-3385

Table of contents:
9 editorial 15 about the London Mobile Learning Group 19 section 1 – theoretical inputs on mobile learning 21 Providing scaffolding by using mobile applications in connectivist learning environment; 27 It’s not what you know but the device you know: The influence of ownership on appropriation of mobile devices for learning on field trips; 31 A critical perspective on mobile learning: Results of a heuristic analysis of the scientific process and a hermeneutic analysis of mobile learning practice; 35 Longitudinal, educational design research investigation of the temporal nature of learning: Taking a Vygotskian approach; 39 A design toolkit for next generation mobile learning; 43 “Recombinant Fiction” theoretical paper and manifesto; 51 Learning in liminal spaces; 53 Creation and curatorship in new media; 57 Using theory to drive the design and re-design of mixed reality visualisation systems 61 section 2 – practical issues to support mobile learning 63 ConEx – mobile collaborative learning environment for conferences; 69 L3T assists m-Learning; 73 Workshop: Mobile Learning in School; 77 Just because they own them, doesn’t mean they use them: Exploring the potential for mobile learning in Higher Education; 81 It’s not a netbook – it’s a lifestyle! How could mobile technologies be used didactically to bridge formal and informal learning?; 85 Lerninfrastrukturen für mobiles Lernen: Rahmenbedingungen bei der Einführung mobiler Lerntechnologien; 89 Using mobile 360 degree performance feedback tools in Health and Social Care practice placement settings: An evaluation from the students’ perspective.; 93 MoLeaP – the mobile learning project database; 97 mobileTUD – der lange Weg zum “mobilen Ruhm”; 103 Learning, mobiles & development; 107 Technology narratives and mobile spatial learning; 111 An invitation to a joint post-assignment reflection – using podcasts as media for offering reflective space within vocational teacher education; 115 Augmented reality as a tool for mobile learning and a method for scholarly dissemination; 119 How should mobile learning be evaluated?; ; 123 M-project: first Steps to applying action research in designing a mobile learning course in higher education; 133 Exploring the order of precedence when using contextual dimensions for mobile information delivery; 137 Mobile lerngemeinschaften: beispiele, erfolgsfaktoren und stolpersteine 143 section 3 – concrete pointers and examples on mobile learning 145 Towards contextualized annotations to improve learning in museum; 149 Use of mobile learning by physician trainees in Botswana; 151 The potential of smartphones to mediate intra-hospital communication and learning practices of doctors. Preliminary results from a scenario-based study.; 157 Supporting learning on building sites with mobile technologies; 161 otu.lea – potenziale einer online-testumgebung für funktionale analphabetInnen und mobile learning; 167 Mobile learning in der lehrveranstaltung “industrielles projektmanagement” – Unterstützung selbstorganisierter und kollaborativer lernprozesse durch iPods; 171 Personalized mobile learning for people with special needs; 175 The use of iPhones in medical education; 179 Near and far contemplating (NFC) the future trends in mobile and what’s happening right here right now; 183 Offline mobile learning with Copyleft hardware; 187 The case for audio in mobile learning; 191 Providing training handouts for corporate learning as ePUB files for mobile devices and e-reader; 195 Mobile learning isn’t one flavour or one approach it’s a whole grocery store; 199 Using mobile devices to support careers advice, information and guidance

And thanks a lot to Manos Agianniotakis for doing a great design work ;-)

Un-conferencing formats at MLCB conference

We now compiled a list with descriptions of the un-conferncing formats that we do at the MLCB conference in Bremen on Monday and Tuesday. They are available on the conference website at www.londonmobilelearning.net/bremen, and – for your convenience – here as well:

 

Radio Workshop
Graham Attwell will introduce in radio making and streaming. This small workshop is followed by a live radio session during lunch time.

Paper jam
Participants get together in small groups and choose a topic on which they are then going to work during the following hour. Aim is to produce a 1 to 2 pages paper that has to me made public on the internet by the single groups.

Poster session
Poster are exhibited on walls or displayed through video projectors positioned in the foyer of the venue. A guide guides the audience from poster to poster. At each of the stations, the poster’s author gives a short presentation. The audience is invited to ask questions and to step into a dialogue with the presenter. The group will afterwards rotate to another poster. Poster session will be held in English and German. Duration of the individual presentations is chaired by the guide and depends on the number of posters.

Speed debate (Monday’s closing session by using speed debate format, enhanced by wiffiti)
Participants post provocative statements on wiffiti (http://wiffiti.com/). Participants then choose issues by voting which will be discussed within 5-10 minutes by this day’s session chairs. Audience will vote the winning side.

Speed dating & shared experience session
Participants will line up in pairs. Each pair gets 5 minutes to present themselves to each other. After 5 minutes, the participants will look for another unknown person. After 30 minutes, you will have met 6 new people from the field. Aim is to learn about people around you which might be helpful to address specific issues in the second half of this un-conferencing session.
In ther second half-hour-slot, after this speed dating session and when people are familiar with each other and learned a bit about peoples’ research focus, participants get together – either in small groups or as plenum – and present their own work by making short statements (1 minute). By doing so, they point on areas that worked well and that can be adopted by others. Also, they point on specific issues that caused problems during the work and which need to be resolved. Participants answer and provide support by giving input in form of their experiences. This should not take more than 4 minutes so that, by the end of the un-conferencing session, 6 projects were discussed. One of the aim of this un-conerencing session is collaborative problem solving.

Media production
Participants will produce small 3-minutes how-to videos with their mobile phone cameras. To plan this video, people meet in small groups and write a story board (within 5-10 minutes). Further 5-10 minutes are dedicated to recording the video. Cutting is not allowed (one take, one shot).

Autonomous unconferencing
Slots free for un-conferencing filled and chaired by participants.

We can take it for granted: It will be about mobile learning

The Book of Abstracts of the MLCB conference is in production now and will be published the week before the conference takes place. However, just to be sure that the conference will be what we promised it to be, I made a quick wordle by using the draft of the BOA.

Registration for the conference, the MirandaMod and the get-together is still open:
http://www.londonmobilelearning.net/registration_bremen.php

The conference website can be accessed via:
http://www.londonmobilelearning.net/bremen

Format mash-ups – Konferenz zwischen Präsentation und Kollaboration


Wie die ‘Mobile learning: crossing boundaries in convergent environments’ Konferenz inhaltlich strukturiert sein sollte, stand ebenso schnell fest wie Größe – wir erwarten zwischen 70 und 100 Teilnehmer – und Veranstaltungsort – die Jugendherberge Bremen bietet schöne Konferenzräume und Rundumverpflegung. Nun gehen auch einen Monat nach der deadline zur Einreichung von Beiträgen noch Anfragen zur aktiven Teilnahme ein. Aktuell umfasst das Programm mehr als 50 Beiträge, darunter 6 Workshops und hands-on sessions.

Von Beginn an war der Plan, neben den traditionellen Beiträgen wie Vorträge und Workshops auch un-conferencing Formate anzubieten. Dies stellt sich in Anbetracht der Menge an Anfragen mittlerweile sogar als Notwendigkeit heraus. Un-conferencing Formate bieten eben Vielen die Möglichkeit, Input einzubringen.

Zunächst haben wir uns dazu entschieden, einige der als 20-minütige Vorträge geplanten Beiträge mit den Workshops zu verbinden. Dadurch sollen Diskussionen gefördert und Blickwinkel erweitert werden. Auch werden durch die Zusammenlegung slots und Räume frei, die mit diskursiven Formaten gefüllt werden. Weiterhin ist angedacht, die traditionellen Formate Vorträge und Arbeitsgruppen – sofern die Referenten und Workshopleiter das möchten – aufzubrechen und durch un-conferencing Formate zu bereichern. Wie genau das funktionieren wird, muss sich erst noch zeigen.

Als un-conferencing/ alternative Formate haben wir folgende geplant (Änderungen vorbehalten!):

 

Poster session:
Poster werden im Foyer ausgehängt. Ein guide führt das Publikum von Poster zu Poster, wobei an jeder Station die Autoren in fünfminütigen Präsentationen ihre Werke vorstellen un im Anschluss daran Fragen des Publikums beantworten.

Radio workshop:
Der radio workshop steht unter den Mottos “present yourself” und “ask your colleagues”. Eine Stunde vor der Mittagspause wird an beiden Tagen kurz in Interviewführung und Konzeption und Durchführung einer halb- bis einstündigen live internet radio show eingeführt. In diesem Zeitraum werden auch kurze statements entworfen und Fragen an Konferenzteilnehmer formuliert. In der darauf folgenden Mittagspause findet die radio show statt.

Speed debate:
Über ein online-tool werden provokative Thesen gesammelt, die die Teilnehmer der speed debate vor Ort formulieren. Durch voting wählen die Teilnehmer die Themen, die dann innerhalb von jeweils 15 Minuten diskutiert werden.

Shared experience session:
In kurzen statements stellen die Teilnehmer dieser session eigenen Arbeiten und Projekte vor. Dabei weisen die Teilnehmer auf Bereiche hin, die gut gelungen sind und von anderen adaptiert werden können, und auf die Bereiche, in denen Probleme auftreten, so dass gemeinsam Lösungen gefunden werden können.

Paper jam:
Teilnehmer finden sich in beliebig großen Gruppen zusammen, um innerhab einer Stunde gemeinsam ein 1-2seitiges Statement, These, Positionspapier, Konzept o.ä. schriftlich zu erstellen. Die Papiere werden am Ende der Session knapp vorgestellt und öffentlich verfügbar gemacht.

Media production:
Medienproduktion mit kleinen Geräten in formellen und informell pädagogisch gerahmten Zusammenhängen. Der Vorschlag ist hier mit den eigenen Handys innerhalb von 20 Minuten ein Erklär-Video zu produzieren. Konkret bedeutet das, in einer kleinen Gruppe innerhalb von 5-10 Minuten ein kurzes Storyboard auszuhandeln. In weiteren 10 bis 15 Minuten zeichnet die Gruppe ein Video von max. 3 Minuten auf, in dem ein Zusammenhang aus dem Alltag erklärt wird. Ein Schneiden des Videos ist nicht erlaubt (one take, one shot).

MLCB conference in Bremen: two proposals accepted


I submitted two proposals for the ‘Mobile Learning:  crossing boundaries in convergent environments’ Conference, taking place in Bremen on March 21 and 22, 2011 (see website and post): A poster to present the MoLeaP database, and a research paper for the theory strand. Both proposals have been accepted (see short abstracts below). Extended abstracts will be available in the book of abstracts before the conference.

The MoLeaP database is part of a project which I held from 2008-2010 at the WLE Centre, IoE, University of London, entitled ”And don’t forget to bring your mobile’. Informing educational target groups
about mobile learning opportunities.’ The research paper covers some of the results deriving from my PhD research; I’ll submit the thesis within the next few weeks.

MoLeaP – the mobile learning project database

This poster aims to introduce ‘MoLeaP – the mobile learning project database’, a service provided by the London Mobile Learning Group (LMLG; www.londonmobilelearning.net) via www.moleap.net. MoLeaP is a public and free-of-charge online database for education professionals interested in mobile learning practice underpinned by theory. Projects, applications, and resources can be submitted by users in order to make materials and experiences available to a broad audience and to encourage the implementation of mobile learning projects in different learning contexts, such as school/college/university, family, workplace, and/or everyday life to enhance the replicability of mobile learning projects, and to contribute to sustainability in teaching, learning and research on mobile learning. The database categories are basing on a conceptual framework of a socio-cultural ecology of mobile learning, and are deriving from a methodological framework for the description and analysis of mobile learning practice.

A critical perspective on mobile learning: Results of a heuristic analysis of the scientific process and a hermeneutic analysis of mobile learning practice

The educational and pedagogic research on mobile learning is about ten years old. Over this time the scientific process can be split into three phases, which reach from (1) research on practice over (2) the application of existing learning theories to (3) the generation of new theoretical and conceptual frameworks for mobile learning. With a view to the different lines of development within these phases, it becomes evident that there are e.g. attempts to not only understand what mobile learning is, but also to demand changes in the educational system. The latter refers not least to a process of democratisation of learners and learning that is about to take place.
Focussing on mobile learning practice, ambiguities and contradictions in the use of mobile devices in learning contexts appear. They are standing in contrast to what research on mobile learning suggests, e.g. ad-hoc use of mobile devices, collaborative learning, the crossing of conceptual and local contexts etc. On the other hand, practice also suggests the power of learners being able to create new learning spaces and concepts as well as implementing multimedia and multiple modes into school learning that are replacing the written text as dominant mode for learning.
The paper will outline the scientific process of the mobile learning field, with focus on the educational and pedagogic developments in mobile learning taking place in the UK and in Germany. The results deriving from this heuristic and hermeneutic analysis will be reflected critically in order to reveal to ‘pseudo’ changes and to ‘success stories’ in the use of mobile devices for learning, as well as to the potential of the discussion.

perspective on

Mobile learning: Crossing boundaries in convergent environments


‘Mobile learning: Crossing boundaries in convergent environments’ Conference

Bremen (Germany) from Monday to Tuesday, March 21st to 22nd, 2011.

Conference Website: http://www.londonmobilelearning.net/bremen

The ‘Mobile learning: Crossing boundaries in convergent environments’ Conference, taking place in Bremen (Germany) from Monday to Tuesday, March 21st to 22nd, 2011, builds on a series of mobile learning research symposia hosted by the WLE Centre for Excellence at the Institute of Education, University of London between 2007 and 2009. It will focus on the challenges of developing new pedagogic approaches and on the potential of mobile devices for learning in formal and informal contexts. As mobile learning is not only about learning with mobile technologies, but also considered to be “new” learning, the conference will look at challenges for research and practice in understanding the changing social and technological structures allowing the use of technology for learning that are present in our personal lives, in school and in work places. Thus mobile learning crosses the boundary of institutional learning and looks at practical fields like research and medicine, too. Also, the conference will look at the latest developments in hardware and software which can support personalised learning.

By focusing on theory and practice, development and use, teaching and learning, formal and informal contexts, the ‘Mobile learning: Crossing boundaries in convergent environments’ Conference intends to offer spaces for researchers, practitioners, developers, the industry and policy makers to exchange ideas, experiences and research around issues and approaches to mobile learning, including sociological and educational issues and their effectiveness and desirability as learning spaces as well as the design of environments.

Whilst the conference includes a traditional research paper strand, we also encourage proposals for sessions in different formats including workshops, posters, cafe and debate sessions, videos, slideshows, podcasts, cartoons and hands on sessions. There will be a German language strand, so contributions in German are also welcome!
We will also provide opportunities for ‘unconference’ events, including the provision of spaces for informal meetings and discussions.

The number of participants is limited to 150. However, video contributions for loop-presentations during the conference from people who are not able to attend in person are welcome.

The ‘Mobile learning: Crossing boundaries in convergent environments’ Conference is preceded by the EduCamp, a specialised BarCamp for people interested in media and learning, which will take place in Bremen from March 19 to 20, 2011.
Pontydysgu will broadcast their show “Sounds of the Bazaar LIVE Radio Programme” live via internet.

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