Presentation at ECER Round Table “Mobile Learning: Learning Across Contexts – Learning In Transition”

As announced earlier this year, colleagues from the London Mobile Learning Group (LMLG) and I will host a Round Table at this year’s ECER conference, taking place in Budapest. These are our session details:

Session: 06 SES 04 A, Mobile Learning: Learning Across Contexts – Learning in Transition
Date: Wednesday, September 09, 2015
Time: 09:00-10:30 a.m.
Room: 104.Oktatóterem [C]

People involved:

  • Judith Seipold (convenor), London Mobile Learning Group (LMLG), CH
  • Norbert Pachler, UCL Institute of Education, University College London, UK
  • Klaus Rummler, Zurich University of Teacher Education (PH Zürich), CH
  • Maria Ranieri, Università degli Studi di Firenze, IT
  • Ben Bachmair, formerly Universität Kassel, DE
  • Keith Turvey, University of Brighton, UK
  • Chair: Theo Hug, University of Innsbruck, AT

Further information, including the official session description, can be accessed via the ECER website.

Handout, service slides and slides from all presenters of our RT can be accessed via the LMLG website. My slides and my video presentation (I will not be there in person) are available also via the preceding links.

Proposal for a Round Table at ECER 2015 in Budapest accepted

Our proposal for a Round Table at the ECER 2015 conference in Budapest was accepted for Network 6 ‘Open Learning: Media, Environments and Cultures’.

Colleagues involved

  • Judith Seipold (convenor), London Mobile Learning Group (LMLG), CH
  • Norbert Pachler, UCL Institute of Education, University College London, UK
  • Klaus Rummler, Zurich University of Teacher Education (PH Zürich), CH
  • Ben Bachmair, formerly Universität Kassel, DE
  • Maria Ranieri, Università degli Studi di Firenze, IT
  • Keith Turvey, University of Brighton, UK

 

Title

Mobile Learning: Learning Across Contexts – Learning In Transition.

 

Abstract

Mobile learning as a global phenomenon is considered to offer new opportunities for teaching and learning as mobile technologies can be used inter alia to realise personalised and learner centred approaches (see e.g. Sharples, Corlett, and Westmancott, 2001), to find ways to include learners who are at a distance to formal education (see e.g. Pachler, Bachmair, and Cook, 2010), to realise collaborative and networked learning formats (see e.g. Traxler, 2010), to address topics that are related to ethical dimensions in educational contexts (see e.g. Wishart, 2011) etc. This is why some advocates of mobile learning argue it is (a pathfinder for) ‘new’ and ‘future’ learning. However, the question arises why this shift in the belief that learning changes significantly through the use of mobile technologies? What is actually behind populist assumptions such as ‘new’ and ‘future’ learning? In what way does or is learning changing – and what can research, theory, practice and politics contribute and learn from this change?
The round table will adopt a dialogic approach with presenters engaging participants in a critical discussion around topics such as ‘innovation’ and, related to it, the ‘transformation’ of learning that is inherent in the affordances and use of mobile technologies in educational contexts. The round table will discuss mobile learning as agentive and meaningful activity and cultural practice rather than adopt a techno-centric perspective. Impulses for innovation and transformation in learning through mobile learning will be explored as well as differences and commonalities across different European countries; there will also be a consideration of structural limits confronting mobile learning.
The round table will frame learners as drivers of innovation and transformation of learning, and their agency and their cultural practices will be in the foreground. It will also give attention: to structures that are relevant for learners in their learning, appropriation and meaning-making processes; to the educational system that has to react to mobile learning practice in order to ensure sustainability; and to learning theory, practice and methodological implications.
Specific reference will be made to: to participatory narrative methodology (Turvey, 2014); ‘problem spaces’ (Turvey & Pachler, forthcoming); learner generated contexts (Seipold, 2014); contextual learning (Bachmair & Pachler, 2015); social justice as institutional prerequisites within life accomplishment and together with the recognition of difference (Bachmair, forthcoming); mobile storytelling (Ranieri, 2015); consequences for learning and policy development (Seipold, 2012); and to implications for teacher education and teachers’ perspective on mobile learning (Maurer & Rummler, 2014; Turvey, 2014).
Relevant framing questions for discussion at the round table are:

Agency and structures

  • What is the role of learner activity in transformation?
  • What is the relationship between learner agency and structures?

Places and contexts

  • Under which conditions is this merging of contexts fruitful for learning? When is it disruptive?

Benefits and limits

  • What are the benefits of mobile technologies and their affordances for learners, teachers, and the education system?

Role of teachers and learners

  • What are the consequences for the roles of learners and teachers?

Policy, educational system and teacher education

  • What does learner centring mean for institutional learning?
  • What is the impact of the introduction of mobile technologies on educational structures?
  • What systemic action is needed to ensure sustainable structures and approaches?
  • What are the implications for teacher education?

Research and interdisciplinarity

  • What are the relative contributions of different scientific disciplines?

 

Date, time and place

Will be available by the beginning of July.

 

Presentation “The ‘Network for Mobile Learning Scenarios’. A network for developing and distributing mobile learning practice.”

On Monday, February 23rd, 2015, I held a presentation as part of our LMLG Workshop at UNESCO Mobile Learning Week. Focus was on our “Network for Mobile Learning Scenarios”, our public “Mobile Learning Scenarios Weblog” and our perspective on school development.

My slides are available here.
Further information about the event and our workshop can be accessed via this blogpost.

Public Mobile Learning Scenarios Weblog now on-line

This week, we launched our “Mobile Learning Scenarios Weblog” (hosted by the LMLG, and part of the “Network for Mobile Learning Scenarios”). People interested in letting teachers, researchers and policy makers know about their mobile learning practice in formal and informal learning contexts are invited to submit their scenarios. Please spread the word!

As the page is quite new and we just started to submit content, the number of scenarios is still low. However, we hope to get submissions soon and will be able to provide a rich resource for people interested in mobile learning practice.

For practitioners who want to realise mobile learning, but need a bit support are invited to use our template for planning and evaluating mobile learning scenarios. It is available in English and German language.

 

Interested in the aims of the Scenarios Weblog? This is what I copied from the page:

“The Network for Mobile Learning Scenarios, which is a sub-network of The London Mobile Learning Group (LMLG; www.londonmobilelearning.net), offers this page aiming to provide a rich resource of mobile learning practice for teachers, researchers, and policy makers.
For the Network, mobile learning is centred on the use of handheld technologies, such as Smartphones, iPods, tablet computers and the functions or apps utilized on these devices to augment and enhance learning objectives and activities. Mobile learning is, especially, the use of these devices beyond the classroom taking learning into the wider landscape, engaging with cultural and social institutions, field studies, networks or experts, as well as considering mobile technologies as part of users’ lifestyle choices and for media consumption, different social contexts and milieus in which people are learning, and the different demands of educational institutions and their policies.
The aim of the ‘Network for Mobile Learning Scenarios’ is to provide perspectives for the implementation of mobile technologies in teaching and learning contexts, be they formal or informal, during school or leisure, at work or at university, by providing ‘scenarios’ for learning and teaching. In contrast to large-scale projects scenarios can be understood as modular units which are replicable, scalable and transferable and apply to the use in specific learning situations. Part of the Networks’s work is the Mobile Learning Scenarios blog that was created to publish examples of mobile learning in current educational practice. It was designed by a pan-European collective of academic researchers wishing to disseminate these examples (scenarios) as both support for teachers and institutions in varying educational contexts and levels and to stimulate further research. The Network embraces the opportunity and potential of mobile technology as the basis of a Community of Practice. As such, we encourage open participation. A strong community learns together by virtue of its activity, so we welcome submissions from practitioners to showcase their use of mobile technologies to enable understanding of the significant experiences, and affordances, of mobile learning. Submissions to the blog facilitate the opportunity to share projects from international practitioners at all levels. This in turn helps to generate feedback, debate and stimulates further research into the paradigms that these dynamic technologies represent.”

Proposal for a Round Table at ECER 2015 in Budapest submitted

Together with colleagues from the wider LMLG circle I submitted a proposal for a round table to the ECER 2015 conference.
Title of the proposal is ‘Mobile Learning: Learning Across Contexts – Learning In Transition’.
Colleagues involved:

  • Norbert Pachler, UCL Institute of Education, University College London, UK
  • Klaus Rummler, Zurich University of Teacher Education (PH Zürich), Switzerland
  • Ben Bachmair, formerly Universität Kassel, DE
  • Maria Ranieri, Università degli Studi di Firenze, IT
  • Keith Turvey, University of Brighton, UK

Results will be available by the beginning of April. The abstract is available here, details re time and place will follow by the beginning of July.

Workshop at UNESCO Mobile Learning Week 2015 accepted

We were notified about the acceptance of our proposal for a workshop at the UNESCO Mobile Learning Week 2015 at the end of 2014. The workshop will be held by members of the London Mobile Learning Group (LMLG) in co-operation with colleagues from the we.learn.it project. Focus will be on ‘how mobile technology is being used to improve educational opportunities for women and girls around the world’. The workshop will take place in Paris on Monday, February 23rd, 2015, from 14:30 to 17:30.
I am going to present our ‘Network for Mobile Learning Scenarios’ @ LMLG, including our soon-to-come public ‘Mobile Learning Scenarios Weblog‘.
Colleagues involved:

  • Norbert Pachler, UCL IoE, UK
  • Anna-Kaarina Kairamo, Aalto University, Finland
  • Miko Laakso, Aalto University, Finland
  • Thomas Strasser, PH Wien, Austria
  • Carlos González-Sancho, OECD, France
  • Ben Bachmair, UCL IoE, UK

Template for mobile learning scenarios

With colleagues from the Network for Mobile Learning Scenarios (NfMLS), a network of the London Mobile Learning Group (LMLG), I developed a first draft of a template that will be used for the network’s public “m-learning scenarios” weblog. The blog will be launched by the end of 2014 / beginning of 2015 at scenarios.londonmobilelearning.net and aims to collect scenarios of implementing mobile learning in formal learning settings such as school, university and work contexts.

Jocelyn Wishart presented the template at mLearn 2014 – The 13th World Conference on Mobile and Contextual Learning. The poster cards can be downloaded here.

The template – which by the way bases on the template that Barbara Zuliani and I developed in co-operation with Christoph Pimmer – is now available for download as pdf form.

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