Mobiles Lernen – Systematik, Theorien und Praxis eines noch jungen Forschungsfeldes

Vor Kurzem erschienen ist der Sammelband “Mobile Learning. Potenziale, Einsatzszenarien und Perspektiven des Lernens mit mobilen Endgeräten”, herausgegeben von Claudia de Witt und Almut Sieber. Darin bin ich mit dem Beitrag “Mobiles Lernen – Systematik, Theorien und Praxis eines noch jungen Forschungsfeldes” vertreten. Das Buch wird geführt unter ISBN: 978-3-531-19483-7 (Print) und 978-3-531-19484-4 (Online) und ist online verfügbar unter http://link.springer.com/book/10.1007/978-3-531-19484-4.

Hier das Abstract meines Artikels:
“Als noch junges Forschungsfeld – Mobiles Lernen liegt erst seit etwas mehr als zehn Jahren im Fokus der medienpädagogischen und erziehungswissenschaftlichen Forschung – gewinnt das Mobile Lernen erst allmählich an Kontur. Eine Analyse des bisherigen vornehmlich britischen Wissenschaftsprozesses des Mobilen Lernens eröffnet den Blick auf die Systematik der medienpädagogischen und erziehungswissenschaftlichen Mobile Learning-Diskussion, ihre Kontexte, Bezugspunkte, Perspektiven und konzeptionellen Schwerpunkte, aber auch auf Erfolge und Problembereiche in der praktischen Umsetzung des Lernens mit Mobiltechnologien in formalisierten Lernkontexten wie dem des Schulunterrichts.”

Seipold, Judith (2013): Mobiles Lernen – Systematik, Theorien und Praxis eines noch jungen Forschungsfeldes. In: de Witt, Claudia; Sieber, Almut (Hrsg.): Mobile Learning – Potenziale, Einsatzszenarien und Perspktiven des Lernens mit mobilen Endgeräten. Springer VS, Wiesbaden, S. 27-54.

Out now: Mobiles Lernen. Analyse des Wissenschaftsprozesses der britischen und deutschsprachigen medienpädagogischen und erziehungswissenschaftlichen Mobile-Learning-Diskussion.

Jetzt verfügbar:

Seipold, Judith (2012): Mobiles Lernen. Analyse des Wissenschaftsprozesses der britischen und deutschsprachigen medienpädagogischen und erziehungswissenschaftlichen Mobile-Learning‐Diskussion. Dissertation zur Erlangung des akademischen Grades eines Doktors der Philosophie (Dr. phil.) im Fachbereich Humanwissenschaften der Universität Kassel.

ISBN: 978-3-00-040411-5
ISBN-A: 10.978.300/0404115
doi: dx.doi.org/10.978.300/0404115

Inhaltsverzeichnis
Buchcover

Kostenlose Vollversion online:
http://nbn-resolving.de/urn:nbn:de:hebis:34-2012121242324

Abstract:

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Out now: Mobile Learning. An analysis of the scientific processes of British and German speaking mobile learning discourses in the fields of media education and educational science.

Available now (in German language only):

Seipold, Judith (2012): Mobiles Lernen. Analyse des Wissenschaftsprozesses der britischen und deutschsprachigen medienpädagogischen und erziehungswissenschaftlichen Mobile-Learning‐Diskussion. Dissertation zur Erlangung des akademischen Grades eines Doktors der Philosophie (Dr. phil.) im Fachbereich Humanwissenschaften der Universität Kassel.

ISBN: 978-3-00-040411-5
ISBN-A: 10.978.300/0404115
doi: dx.doi.org/10.978.300/0404115

Table of contents
Book cover

Free and full online version:
http://nbn-resolving.de/urn:nbn:de:hebis:34-2012121242324

Abstract:

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Designing Mobile Learning in School Contexts – Considerations and Examples for Practice

Today I uploaded the following text that I have written a couple of weeks ago already to our LMLG website (www.londonmobilelearning.net). The short piece is a result of my recent work on mobile learning. The pdf-file can be accessed here or as text-version below.

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Providing continuity for learner centred learning with mobile phones in schools

The following article is a follow up of my presentation given at a Mobile Media Seminar at the University of Aarhus (DK) in March 2008.

Seipold, Judith (2008): Mobile learning at the interface between formal and informal learning. Harnessing mobile phones and their modes of representation for curricular learning. Seminar Mobile Media, 10. März 2008, Aarhus Universitet, Centre for IT & Learning, Aarhus.

The article was written in English (not the best English) and translated into Danish. The Danish language version was published in 2010.

Seipold, Judith (2010): Kan brugen af mobiletelefoner i undervisningen styrke elev-centrerede læreprocesser? (Englischer Titel: Providing continuity for learner centred learning with mobile phones in schools). In: Bang, Joergen; Dalsgaard, Christian (Red.): Læring & Medier (LOM), Nr. 5: Læring i videnssamfundet. Om vidensformidling, videnskonstruktion og vidensdeling. ISSN 1903-248X. Online.

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Presentation “Critical perspective on mobile learning” held at MLCB

On March 21, 2011 I held my presentation “A critical perspective on mobile learning: Results of a heuristic analysis of the scientific process and a hermeneutic analysis of mobile learning practice” at the “Mobile learning: Crossing boundaries in convergent environments” conference in Bremen (conference website).

 

Video

A Critical Perspective on Mobile Learning: Results…

 

Abstract

The following abstract was published in
Rummler, Klaus; Seipold, Judith; Lübcke, Eileen; Pachler, Norbert; Attwell, Graham (eds.): Mobile learning:
Crossing boundaries in convergent environments. Book of abstracts. 21-22 March 2011, Bremen, Germany. ISSN 1753-3385
which is available for download at http://www.londonmobilelearning.net/downloads/MLCB_BOA_Bremen-2011_Crossing-Boundaries-full_2011-03-18.pdf.

 

Judith Seipold

A critical perspective on mobile learning: Results of a heuristic analysis of the scientific process and a hermeneutic analysis of mobile learning practice

Abstract
Educational and pedagogic research on mobile learning is about ten years old. Over this time the scientific process can be split into three phases, which reach from (1) research on practice via (2) the application of existing learning theories to (3) the generation of new theoretical and conceptual frameworks for mobile learning. With a view to the different lines of development within these phases it becomes evident that there are e.g. attempts not only to understand what mobile learning is, but also to demand changes in the educational system. The latter refers not least to a process of democratisation of learners and learning that is about to take place.
Focussing on mobile learning practice, ambiguities and contradictions in the use of mobile devices in learning contexts appear. They stand in contrast to what research on mobile learning suggests, e.g. ad-hoc use of mobile devices, collaborative learning, the crossing of conceptual and local contexts etc. On the other hand, practice also suggests the power of learners being able to create new learning spaces and concepts as well as implementing multimedia and multiple modes into school learning that replace the written text as dominant mode for learning.
The paper will outline the scientific processes of the mobile learning field with a focus on the educational and pedagogic developments in mobile learning taking place in the UK and in Germany. The results deriving from this heuristic and hermeneutic analysis will be reflected critically in order to reveal ‘pseudo’ changes and ‘success stories’ in the use of mobile devices for learning, as well as the potential of such a discussion.

Keywords
mobile learning, theory, practice, scientific process, analysis, qualitative heuristics, objective hermeneutic, dialectics of practice

1. Structure of the scientific process of the educational and pedagogic research on mobile learning
The development of the scientific mobile learning discussion in the UK over the recent years resulted in the autonomy of the discipline in the educational and pedagogic field.
Referring to categories of a qualitative heuristic method, the process can be described in terms of social and cultural contexts of the mobile learning discussion (i.e. related disciplines such as sociology and e-learning), the social practices constituting the mobile learning discussion (i.e. lines of argumentation, concepts, definitions), and the developing process characterising the mobile learning discussion. The latter consists of three phases each of which is characterised by lines of development. Whilst the phases are structured by time, the lines of development can be seen as characterising the respective chronological phases. In addition, the lines of development are describable as approaches and fields of research that are persisting independent of time.
Phase 1: Explorative, technology-centred and practical implementation: Phase one can be described as explorative. Mobile devices were installed in educational settings in order to see how mobile technologies allow for changes in teaching and learning processes. The discussion was very much technology driven.
Phase 2: Application of existing theories and conceptual frameworks: The second phase focuses on the application of existing theories and conceptual frameworks such as Activity Theory (Engeström, 2001, 2005) and the Conversational Framework (Laurillard, 2007), as well as on personal (Green, Facer, Rudd, Dillon, & Humphreys, 2005), collaborative and situated learning (Lave & Wenger, 1991) with the aim to explore dynamic processes around formal and informal learning and knowledge building.
Phase 3: Building of theories and conceptual frameworks: The third and most recent phase is structured by attempts to build theories and conceptual frameworks, e.g. the socio-cultural ecology of mobile learning (Pachler, Bachmair, & Cook, 2010) or the “Theory of mobile learning” (Sharples, Taylor & Vavoula, 2010). Now, the learner is seen as standing at the centre of his/her learning processes. Against the background of the construction of theoretical and conceptual frameworks, the role of the devices is becoming less important. Instead, the social/societal framework and the learners’ expertise, agency and cultural practices are gaining importance. Mobility is no longer defined through the devices, but through the learners’ abilities to act flexible in ever changing and self-constructed learning contexts.

2. The dialectics of mobile learning practice
The analysis of mobile learning practices in school contexts was realised according to categories that were developed against the background of the socio-cultural ecology of mobile learning (Pachler, Bachmair & Cook, 2010). Focusing on the actual use of mobile technologies and convergent media it became evident that learning with mobile devices does not necessarily foster ad-hoc, collaborative, personalised, self-directed and innovative learning. In most cases, the teaching design is pre-structuring the use of the devices and thus limits in consequence the potentials inherent in the use of mobile technologies for learning. Here, mobile learning appears as old wine in new bottles. In case teachers are providing spaces to learners to act according to their expertises, interests, agency and cultural practices, innovative use of the devices and the generation of contexts by learners can be discovered. Here, user-generated contexts are a fruitful concept to frame mobile learning and to approach the design, the use and the analysis of mobile learning.

3. Methodology: qualitative heuristics and objective hermeneutic

The scientific process of the mobile learning discussion was carried out by using a qualitative heuristic method (see e.g. Kleining & Witt, 2000; Krotz, 2005). This ‘discovering’ method means that the analysis intends to bring aspects to the foreground that are inherent in the discussion. By referring to key components of this method, the following aspects were considered in order to allow for the caption of this phenomenon: the development process, social practices relevant for establishing the discussion, the contexts in which the field was raising and the meanings deriving from the development process.
As for the analysis of mobile learning practices, a hermeneutic analysis was undertaken. Hermeneutics is an interpretative method, which means that the scientist interprets phenomena according to his or her research questions, the theoretical background he or she is using and his or her ‘preferred reading patterns’.
Together, the heuristic and the hermeneutic analysis of the mobile learning field allow for conclusions that are able to describe and understand the field according to its structure, elements, development lines and their relation to each other as well as for tendencies and contradictions. The aim is to not only to be able to characterise the field, but also to point to discrepancies and thus aspects that need to be considered for further research and the development of the mobile learning field.

4. Results: Mobile Learning is governed by political demands, contradictions in practices and innovative potentials
From this perspective mobile learning is not only about learning but also – and more generally – about politics and the need to understand the school system, learning and the roles of teachers and learners in the context of current changes of mass communication and society. However, having a look at the mobile learning practice, there are several issues that are standing in contradiction with what research and theory development suggest. In fact, a lot of ‘pseudo’-opening is taking place which makes mobile learning often appear as old wine in new bottles. This applies for example to features of mobile devices such as the ad-hoc access to and distribution of information, to the teaching design that can reduce learners’ activities with mobile devices to behaviouristic learning instead of supporting constructivist learning, or to situated learning that can become gathering of information through the use of convergent media such as platforms. Besides, and this is part of the dialectics of mobile learning, there are real enhancements and innovations taking place in the use of mobile devices which are on the one hand achievements of the learners themselves, and which might on the other hand result from what is described as “pseudo-opening” above. Former are related to the use of modes of representation as well as the learners’ creativity. Also, learners revise existing structures, connect them and established new ones in order to create their own convergent learning spaces and “learner-generated contexts” (see e.g. Cook, 2010). Latter provide structures for equal access of information and discursive engagement in learning materials.

References
Cook, J. (2010). Mobile Learner Generated Contexts. Research on the Internalization of the World of Cultural Products. In B. Bachmair (Ed.), Medienbildung in neuen Kulturräumen. Die deutschsprachige und britische Diskussion (pp. 113–125). Wiesbaden: VS Verlag für Sozialwissenschaften.

Engeström, Y. (2001). Expansive learning at work: Toward an activity theoretical reconceptualisation. Journal of Education and Work, 14(1), 133–156.

Engeström, Y. (2005). Knotworking to Create Collaborative Intentionality Capital in Fluid Organizational Fields. Advances in Interdisciplinary Studies of Work Teams, (11), 307–336. Retrieved from http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/S1572-0977(05)11011-5.

Green, H., Facer, K., Rudd, T., Dillon, P., & Humphreys, P. (2005). Personalisation and Digital Technologies (Futurelab Report).

Kleining, G., & Witt, H. (2000). Qualitativ-heuristische Forschung als Entdeckungsmethodologie für Psychologie und Sozialwissenschaften: Die Wiederentdeckung der Methode der Introspektion als Beispiel. Forum Qualitative Sozialforschung, 1(1). Retrieved from http://nbn-resolving.de/urn:nbn:de:0114-fqs0001136.

Krotz, F. (2005). Neue Theorien entwickeln: Eine Einführung in die Grounded Theory, die Heuristische Sozialforschung und die Ethnographie anhand von Beispielen aus der Kommunikationsforschung. Köln: Herbert von Halem Verlag. Retrieved from http://www.gbv.de/dms/hebis-darmstadt/toc/11253757X.pdf.

Laurillard, D. (2007). Pedagogical forms for mobile learning: framing research question. In N. Pachler (Ed.), Occasional Papers in Work-based Learning: Vol. 1. Mobile learning – towards a research agenda (pp. 153–175). London: WLE Centre. Retrieved from http://www.wlecentre.ac.uk/cms/files/occasionalpapers/mobilelearning_pachler_2007.pdf.

Lave, J., & Wenger, E. (1991). Situated learning: Legitimate peripheral participation. Learning in Doing: Social, Cognitive, and Computational Perspect. Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press.

Pachler, N., Bachmair, B., & Cook, J. (2010). Mobile learning: structures, agency, practices. New York: Springer.

Sharples, M., Taylor, J., & Vavoula, G. (2010). A Theory of Learning for the Mobile Age. Learning through Conversation and Exploration Across Contexts. In B. Bachmair (Ed.), Medienbildung in neuen Kulturräumen. Die deutschsprachige und britische Diskussion (pp. 87–99). Wiesbaden: VS Verlag für Sozialwissenschaften.

MLCB conference book of abstracts

Today in the afternoon we published the book of abstracts of the ‘Mobile learning: Crossing boundaries in convergent environments’ Conference. The file is available as download from the LMLG website.

The BOA is edited by Klaus Rummler, Judith Seipold, Eileen Lübcke, Norbert Pachler and Graham Attwell and runs under the ISSN No. 1753-3385

Table of contents:
9 editorial 15 about the London Mobile Learning Group 19 section 1 – theoretical inputs on mobile learning 21 Providing scaffolding by using mobile applications in connectivist learning environment; 27 It’s not what you know but the device you know: The influence of ownership on appropriation of mobile devices for learning on field trips; 31 A critical perspective on mobile learning: Results of a heuristic analysis of the scientific process and a hermeneutic analysis of mobile learning practice; 35 Longitudinal, educational design research investigation of the temporal nature of learning: Taking a Vygotskian approach; 39 A design toolkit for next generation mobile learning; 43 “Recombinant Fiction” theoretical paper and manifesto; 51 Learning in liminal spaces; 53 Creation and curatorship in new media; 57 Using theory to drive the design and re-design of mixed reality visualisation systems 61 section 2 – practical issues to support mobile learning 63 ConEx – mobile collaborative learning environment for conferences; 69 L3T assists m-Learning; 73 Workshop: Mobile Learning in School; 77 Just because they own them, doesn’t mean they use them: Exploring the potential for mobile learning in Higher Education; 81 It’s not a netbook – it’s a lifestyle! How could mobile technologies be used didactically to bridge formal and informal learning?; 85 Lerninfrastrukturen für mobiles Lernen: Rahmenbedingungen bei der Einführung mobiler Lerntechnologien; 89 Using mobile 360 degree performance feedback tools in Health and Social Care practice placement settings: An evaluation from the students’ perspective.; 93 MoLeaP – the mobile learning project database; 97 mobileTUD – der lange Weg zum “mobilen Ruhm”; 103 Learning, mobiles & development; 107 Technology narratives and mobile spatial learning; 111 An invitation to a joint post-assignment reflection – using podcasts as media for offering reflective space within vocational teacher education; 115 Augmented reality as a tool for mobile learning and a method for scholarly dissemination; 119 How should mobile learning be evaluated?; ; 123 M-project: first Steps to applying action research in designing a mobile learning course in higher education; 133 Exploring the order of precedence when using contextual dimensions for mobile information delivery; 137 Mobile lerngemeinschaften: beispiele, erfolgsfaktoren und stolpersteine 143 section 3 – concrete pointers and examples on mobile learning 145 Towards contextualized annotations to improve learning in museum; 149 Use of mobile learning by physician trainees in Botswana; 151 The potential of smartphones to mediate intra-hospital communication and learning practices of doctors. Preliminary results from a scenario-based study.; 157 Supporting learning on building sites with mobile technologies; 161 otu.lea – potenziale einer online-testumgebung für funktionale analphabetInnen und mobile learning; 167 Mobile learning in der lehrveranstaltung “industrielles projektmanagement” – Unterstützung selbstorganisierter und kollaborativer lernprozesse durch iPods; 171 Personalized mobile learning for people with special needs; 175 The use of iPhones in medical education; 179 Near and far contemplating (NFC) the future trends in mobile and what’s happening right here right now; 183 Offline mobile learning with Copyleft hardware; 187 The case for audio in mobile learning; 191 Providing training handouts for corporate learning as ePUB files for mobile devices and e-reader; 195 Mobile learning isn’t one flavour or one approach it’s a whole grocery store; 199 Using mobile devices to support careers advice, information and guidance

And thanks a lot to Manos Agianniotakis for doing a great design work ;-)

Medienbildung im Spannungsfeld alltäglicher Handlungsmuster und Unterrichtsstrukturen.

Einen Text zum Projekt “Schul-Internet Medientauschbörse – Förderung der Medienkompetenz unter den Bedingungen einer zusammenwachsenden Medienwelt” (kurz: Medientauschbörse) habe ich ihm Jahr 2009 zusammen mit Klaus Rummler und Julia Rasche verfasst. Wir drei waren damals am Projekt beteiligt, hatten unsere jeweils eigenen Fragestellungen und haben nun – nachdem das Projekt bereits abgeschlossen war – noch einen Text dazu veröffentlicht. In ihm setzen wir uns mit Aspekten der Medienbildung auseinander, was damals nicht explizit Teil der Fragestellung war.

Der Text kann über Springerlink eingesehen werden. URL siehe unten.

 

Seipold, Judith; Rummler, Klaus; Rasche, Julia (2010): Medienbildung im Spannungsfeld alltäglicher Handlungsmuster und Unterrichtsstrukturen. In: Bachmair, Ben (Hrsg.): Medienbildung in neuen Kulturräumen. Die deutschsprachige und britische Diskussion. Wiesbaden: VS Verlag für Sozialwissenschaften, S. 227-241. Online.

3rd WLE Mobile Learning Symposium: Mobile Learning Cultures across Education, Work and Leisure

On March 27, 2009 the 3rd WLE Mobile Learning Symposium took place at the WLE Centre, IoE, London. I was – together with Norbert Pachler, Agnes Kukulska-Hulme and Giasemi Vavoula – organiser of this event.

We produced a lot of output such as the book of abstracts, slides and, as far as available, video recordings of the presentations which can be accessed via the old conference website.

I took the opportunity and presented MoLeaP (for the first time), as well as a methodology of researching mobile learning. Latter was developed for and applied to the analysis of mobile learning projects to make use of them for the development of the socio-cultural ecology of mobile learning (see e.g. Pachler, Bachmair & Cook 2010).

 

Towards a methodology of researching mobile learning

Slides
Towards a methodology of researching mobile learning
Video
Towards a methodology of researching mobile learning

 

Mo-LeaP – The mobile learning projects database

Slides
Mo-LeaP – The mobile learning projects database
Poster

 

Video

Mo-LeaP – The mobile learning projects database

Mobile phones in school. Selected m-learning projects from Great Britain and the German speaking countries.

The publication “Mobile phones in school. Selected m-learning projects from Great Britain and the German speaking countries” was published in the proceedings of the conference “Internationale Tagung Medien – Wissen – Bildung: Explorationen neuer Räume, Relationen und Dynamiken in digitalisierten Medienökologien” that took place at Innsbruck University from June 25 to 26, 2007. It is my first article about mobile learning, and it gives a short overview over how mobile learning can look like and by using which tools a systematic approach to the analysis of mobile learning practice can be realised.

The text is availble online via the URL given below.

 

Seipold, Judith (2008): Mobile phones in school. Selected m-learning projects from Great Britain and the German speaking countries. In: Hug, Theo (Hrsg.): Media, Knowledge & Education. Exploring new Spaces, Relations and Dynamics in Digital Media Ecologies. Innsbruck: innsbruck university press, S. 266-281. Online.

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